MI's Attorney General Fights Freeman's Freedom

billschuette2We continue to seek petition signatures for the Governor’s executive clemency based on Freeman’s actual innocence and his poor health. In order to sign up, please click on Change.org and share with others. A special "thank you" to those who have already signed.

Freeman has one other hope besides executive clemency (which the petition is about). It is one last appeal (called a habeas) before the Federal Court. It will take months or even a year or more to be ruled upon. But on that score, we just got discouraging news, which makes executive clemency that much more important. We have recently learned that Bill Schuette’s Attorney General's office is fighting Freeman’s habeas appeal. (The AG is also fighting exonerees from getting their just compensation, but that is another story.) That office first said it would examine Freeman’s actual innocence but then changed its mind and did not review the abundance of evidence that he was not connected with the murder in any way.

The sad fact is that the AG does not want to reveal or highlight the documented misconduct used to convict an innocent man. It does not want to embarrass a prominent Federal Judge (who prosecuted Freeman) whose authority and influence is considerable. The AG does not want the public to know that the State and St. Clair County have spent 32 years shielding this case from re-examination, protecting a conviction that is totally unsupported by the evidence. (By the way, this is not necessarily just a “Republican” matter. The AG under Granholm and, indeed, Granholm herself did nothing to help redress this miscarriage of justice).

Having signed into law the Wrongful Imprisonment Compensation Act, Rick Snyder is probably more aware of the problem of wrongful convictions than any of his predecessors. Not being eligible for re-election this November, outgoing executives typically are less politically motivated and are more likely "do the right thing". The more signatures we get, the more we get the point across to Snyder that people no longer want "law and order", which translates into "lock more people up". We want simple justice. And for Fred Freeman, justice means freedom!

Watch the Video! Sign the Petition!


fredfreeman lie detector sm#FreeFredFreeman

We want to collect as many signatures of concerned citizens, innocence groups, lawyers and law firms that we can in order to demonstrate to the State that the citizens of Michigan and this country consider this to be a gross injustice which needs to be corrected. We are providing the complete Application for Pardon submitted by the Michigan Innocence Clinic (U of M Law School) on behalf of Mr. Freeman. Also is the most recent media release. Click on the attachments above this article in order to download them.

For additional materials, including a 7-part newscast covering all the basic elements of the case, go to http://www.provinginnocence.org/cases/temujin-kensu.html.

You will find the Petition at https://chn.ge/2DZ4krf . Please post this link on your personal social media. Thank you.

 

 

An Interview with Freeman's Alibi - Michelle Woodworth

This interview of Michelle Woodworth was filmed about a month ago. It is an engaging description of Michelle being with Fred 450 miles away when the murder took place and the subsequent treatment of her by law enforcement. We at Proving Innocence continue to be outraged at this sham of a murder conviction, a conviction which has now robbed Fred of 31 years of his life! How do you respond to this 8 1/2 minute interview? Click on Comments and let your voice be heard!

$5000 to $25,000 $50,000 Reward for Information Regarding Kensu's Case

Wednesday, June 28th, the series Reasonable Doubt on the Investigation Discovery Channel devoted the episode to Temujin Kensu. Temujin is offering a reward. The funds come out of Temujin's own money he collected from his lawsuite against the Michigan Department of Corrections (MDOC). The wording Temujin sent us is as follows:

“A reward of up to $5000 is being offered for any credible information regarding the November 5th, 1986, St. Clair County Community College parking lot shooting death of Scott Arnold Macklem.

A reward of up to $25,000 is being offered for any information that either exonerates Mr. Kensu, who was wrongfully convicted for this crime, and/or leads to an arrest or conviction of the responsible party.

Moreover, Mr. Kensu’s attorneys at 1-800-Law-Firm will match any reward that leads to the exoneration of him, bringing the potential reward to $50,000. Call 1 (800) 595-0830 if you have information to report.”

You may watch Episode 10 of Reasonable Doubt, Long Distance Murder by clicking on the link, but you must have a cable subscription that gives you access to the Investigation Discovery Channel.

Wrongful Imprisonment Comp Act

Attachments:
Download this file (2015-HIB-4536.pdf)House Bill 4536

After over eight years of being stalled in committee, the Michigan House Bill - 4536, commonly known as the "wrongful imprisonment compensation act", passed 8 to 0. Thirty other states have enacted such a bill in the recognition that the state must be responsible when it deprives individuals of years of their lives when they are indeed innocent.

Not only has it passed committee, but a reading of the bill shows that it has jetisoned much of the weaknesses of earlier versions. Those versions had layer after layer to restrictions about the particular causes of the alledged crime and that it only applied to convictions overturned by strong scientific evidence, such as DNA. Such restrictions were a result of political concessions that made no sense and catered to lawmakers full of myths about wrongful convictions and thier causes. In fact, while many urged acceptance of such a bill because "politics is compromise" and "get what you can now", others invested in the passage of such a bill, such as Ken Wyniemko, himself an exoneree and activist in this cause, could not put their support behind it. It was, indeed, disappointing and infuriating to read. It inexplicably said that being exonerated by the same courts that convicted the person wasn't enough.

The current bill as it was introduced into committee is a breath of fresh air. It is more rational, acknolweging that when the courts acknowledged the error, the state needs to act out of a responsibility which it has to make things right, to the degree that such a thing is even possible. Below this article you will find the link to download the bill. Next step, call your representative and express your support.