Post #3: Advocacy, Part I

WHO KILLED SCOTT MACKLEM?
Author’s Note: Every wrongful conviction causes dual torment: the torment of the innocent yet imprisoned individual, and the social torment that the actual perpetrator remains free. This blog focuses primarily on the latter, in the hope that we will gain more knowledge about the murderer of Scott Macklem.

Post #3: Advocacy, Part I
Date: 04/20/17

As an attorney, I find it repugnant that the defense attorney appointed to represent the accused person in the murder of Scott Macklem didn’t work harder to assure an acquittal. Scott was 20 years old when he was found shot to death in a parking lot at St. Clair County Community College on November 5, 1986. After one interview with Scott’s pregnant fiancée, the police focused on one individual and one only - the wrong person.

You might believe that the failure of the accused’s attorney to search for the truth was an injustice only to the accused. That is inaccurate. A criminal defense attorney, just like any other attorney is bound by an ethical duty. The Michigan Rules of Professional Conduct provide “[A] lawyer is a representative of clients, an officer of the legal system and a public citizen having special responsibility for the quality of justice.” The quality of justice depends inexorably on truth. The defense attorney in this case ignored the truth, allowing an innocent man to be convicted and just as importantly, he allowed a murderer to avoid any suspicion of culpability.

Lawyers in general have a tainted reputation. When it comes to criminal defense attorneys, many people, including some lawyers, feel a certain amount of disgust at the idea that someone could advocate for a criminal. Television shows and movies often portray criminal defense attorneys as “sleezy.” Of course, those entertainment media also portray the accused as undoubtedly guilty, as we sit in anticipation of the announcement of conviction from the jury.

I have no particular opinion about criminal defense attorneys in general. I respect our Constitution which guarantees that the accused are innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. I respect that the Constitution provides that the accused are entitled to representation. These protections are intended to assure the quality of justice.

Read more: Post #3: Advocacy, Part I

Post #2: Reputations

SERIES: WHO KILLED SCOTT MACKLEM?
Author’s Note:  Every wrongful conviction causes dual torment:  the torment of the innocent yet imprisoned individual, and the social torment that the actual perpetrator remains free.  This blog focuses primarily on the latter, in the hope that we will gain more knowledge about the murderer of Scott Macklem.

Post #2:  Reputations
Date:  02/22/17
macklem
You may wonder how the investigation of the murder of Scott Macklem resulted in a wrongful conviction.  Scott was 20 years old when he was found shot to death in a parking lot at St. Clair County Community College on November 5, 1986.  Scott grew up in Croswell, Michigan.  His father was elected Mayor of Croswell in 1982, while Scott was attending Croswell-Lexington High School.  Scott’s father also owned an insurance agency in Croswell.  He was an influential member of the community.

Read more: Post #2: Reputations

Post #1: Misdirection

SERIES: WHO KILLED SCOTT MACKLEM?
Author’s Note: Every wrongful conviction causes dual torment: the torment of the innocent yet imprisoned individual, and the social torment that the actual perpetrator remains free. This blog focuses primarily on the latter, in the hope that we will gain more knowledge about the murderer of Scott Macklem.

Post #1: Misdirection
02/08/07
Scott Macklem was 20 years old when he was found shot to death in a parking lot at St. Clair County Community College on November 5, 1986. The man convicted in his murder did not have an opportunity or the means to carry out this crime. He was convicted based on what I am loathe to describe as circumstantial evidence, since it was actually hypothetical evidence, manufactured evidence, wild speculation, and copious references to the accused’s “bad character.” In fact, there is more than copious, actual evidence that this was a wrongful conviction. The wrongful conviction is another crime, which will be addressed in later posts. Suffice it to say, I’m convinced as is every legal scholar, independent law enforcement consultant and investigator who has looked at this case, that the person who killed Scott Macklem is still at large.

Scott was a 1984 graduate of Croswell-Lexington High School. He was popular, and a star athlete on the baseball and golf teams. At the time of his murder, he was taking general business courses at St. Clair County Community College. He missed his 8:00 a.m. gym class that morning. That wasn’t particularly unusual, since his attendance at college had been irregular. What was unusual was when Scott was found, his gym bag lay next to his body. Why did Scott have a gym bag outside his car when he didn’t go to his gym class?

Click here for the complete article: Post #1: Misdirection